Flood in Uganda: the Copernicus Emergency Management Service has been activated

Since September 2019, Uganda is facing unprecedented flooding and continued rising water levels due to intense and prolonged rainfall. The Ministry of Water and Environment of the Republic of Uganda has requested international assistance.


(c) CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO, This image was acquired by Envisat's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) on 6 October 2008, working in Full Resolution Mode providing a spatial resolution of 300 m


The majority of the affected population (58%) lives in the Kasese District in the Rwenzoris. Flood risks around Lake Kyoga are worsening and the impacts not yet quantified. Copernicus EMS is request to produce Delineation mapping at regular intervals (September, December, March, April, July) since September 2019 and produce a rapid analysis of the current situation concerning floods and flood traces over the EMSR438 AOIs. Furthermore, delineation mapping of recent landslides and mudflows in the Kasese District is requested.

Maps will be available for download at the following website: https://emergency.copernicus.eu/mapping/list-of-components/EMSR446 

Other ESA images of floods from space:

THE COPERNICUS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SERVICE (CEMS)

Implemented by the European Commission as part of the Copernicus Programme, the CEMS provides on-demand detailed information for selected emergency situations that arise from natural or man-made disasters anywhere in the world: On Demand Mapping (Rapid Mapping, Risk and Recovery Mapping), Early Warning and Monitoring. 


FLOODS IN AFRICA

Floods occur recurrently in Africa, are sources of damages and deaths and can hamper the gains the African countries are making in terms of development.





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THE GMES AND AFRICA PROGRAMME, AND THE MANAGEMENT OF FLOODS IN WESTERN AFRICA

The GMES and Africa Support Programme promotes the usage of Earth Observation (EO) data and products to better manage the African natural Resources and helps decision making processes. Indeed, EO has become worldwide a powerful and extensively used tool for all phenomenons happening at the surface of Earth but still is poorly used by Africans for various reasons. 

Through a grant scheme and thanks to AU and EU funding, the GMES and Africa Support Programme finances 12 African Consortia developing applications of EO to natural resources management in the fields of Marine and Coastal, and Waters and Lands. 

In Western Africa, the G&A CSSTE-led Consortium deals specifically with Flooding management in support to National services and Disasters Management Organisations. The overall objective of the project is “to enhance the efficiency of flood monitoring, assesment and management in West Africa by providing Earth Observation (EO) based services on real time basis to disaster management organisations and boosting their human capacity to adapt to their services”.


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