A MOOC on the role of satellite Earth observation in ocean monitoring.

A course to be introduced to the powerful role of satellite ‘Earth observation’ (EO) technology in monitoring our oceans, and to beautiful and inspiring imagery and data.



This course provides an overview of the different types of data, imagery and their applications and of the fundamental techniques and methodologies of working with this data. It gives access at practical examples of using ocean monitoring EO data - in real-world case-studies and to a range of areas of policy and decision-making - and explores emerging technologies and trends.

It introduces the visitor to the operational marine data stream from EUMETSAT in the context of the ‘Copernicus’ programme. It highlights the role of the Sentinel-3, Jason-3 and future Sentinel-6 ocean monitoring satellites and the contributing missions providing marine data for Copernicus – such as Metop and Meteosat. One can also explore the role of the Copernicus Marine Environment Service (CMEMS), focussing on the applications of its data for users and its wider benefits to society.



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  • About the Course
  • Course overview
    • Week 1 - Ocean and Climate, Why satellites?, The Copernicus Programme, Climate Change, Large Scale Ocean Currents, Sea Level Rise, ENSO, Etc... 
    • Week 2 - Oceans Weather and Hazards, Weather Predictions, Sea Surface Temperature, Tropical Storms, Storm surges, Wave height, Predicting Sea Level Rise, Details revealed by models.
    • Week 3 - Ocean Transport and Hazards, Overview, Argo floats and in-situ sensors, Ocean salinity, Ice and Iceberg, Oil spill monitoring, Ocean Color, Ocean Water Quality,  
    • Week 4 - Living Oceans, Phytoplankton and Climate, Carbon and Phytoplankton, Ocean Colour and Sustainable fisheries, Models, Monitoring Ecosystems. 
    • Week 5 - Open Data and Emerging data Services. Policy, Socio Economics, Energy, the Future, See Level Rise, Citizen Science (how public observation projects and crowdsourcing are great ways of collecting in situ measurements) 

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